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Parkes Services Club GM Denis Lane, Currajong CEO Jeff Evans and Parkes Services Club President Terry Knowles with the cheque donation.
Parkes Services Club GM Denis Lane, Currajong CEO Jeff Evans and Parkes Services Club President Terry Knowles with the cheque donation.

PARKES SERVICES CLUB BIG DONATION TO HELP TRANSPORT SHORTFALL

IF ever there was an example of the generosity of the Parkes business community it was on full display this week when the Parkes Services Club donated $5000 to Currajong Disability Services to assist with transport needs. The cheque was donated by General Manager Denis Lane and Parkes Services Club President Terry Knowles.

The donation, which is part of Parkes Services Club’s commitment to contributing to the community and community organisations, will aide clients of Currajong who rely heavily on timely and adequate transport. Transport has become a big issue since the implementation of the NDIS in the Central West since July 1 last year.

“It is a tremendous gesture by the Parkes Services Club and we are humbled by the kind donation,” said CDS CEO Jeff Evans.

“Parkes Services Club, like Currajong, fulfils an important role in the regional community on a number of levels and this assistance allows our clients to navigate day-to-day life with more ease.

“We are extremely thankful to them and all our supporters who have really stepped up over the past few months,” said Jeff.

The donation will also allow clients to attend specialist appointments, workshops and other activities factored into their NDIS plans that previously they may not have been able to attend without huge costs and significant planning.

“This donation will directly help our clients who need to seek out individual or group consultations, meetings or care,” said Jeff Evans.

“Prior to this it was challenging to maintain certain services but this alleviates some of the pressure on all concerned.

“It is just another example of the magnificent spirit of the Parkes and Central West business community helping out,” he said.

“Thanks again Parkes Services Club for your unwaivering support and the incredible gesture.”

For Terry Knowles, it was a great to again support a local organisation along with the business community.

“One of our staff noticed Currajong’s fundraising efforts to improve services and resources so we thought how can we help?” said Terry.

“Currajong plays an important role in the Parkes regional community.

“It is tremendous that we have been able to help out in some small way.”

Debbie Hewitt trying out the new care chair with Wendy Clothier
Debbie Hewitt trying out the new care chair with Wendy Clothier

CURRAJONG Disability Services have finally received the long awaited Care Chair from the proceeds of the Railway Bowling Club’s Day On The Green from early February.

In a real boost for CDS, enough funds were not only raised for one Care Chair but two, ensuring all clients in need will be able to access the new equipment moving forward. That brings the total of Care Chairs now at Currajong to three.

Contributors included Cunningham’s IGA who donated from their Community Chest Program towards the cause while Companions Thru Cancer also stepped up with a substantial gift. There was also a significant personal contribution made directly to CDS for the new Care Chair from a generous local community member.

“It’s fantastic for Currajong,” said Jeff Evans, CEO of Currajong Disability Services.

“There has been a tremendous collective effort and fundraising drive and we are ecstatic.

“It has exceeded our expectations and we can’t thank everyone enough!”

The first care chair has arrived with the second on its way but plans are underway to get it here sooner rather than later which is great news for CDS clients in need.

“It has been a great start to 2018 for us and we hope to continue our magical 25 year anniversary,” said Jeff.

Watch this space for more info on the second care chair and CDS 25 year celebrations.

Glenn Westcott (PCS), Dane Millerd (CDS) and Jason Wynstra (PCS)

PARKES CHRISTIAN SCHOOL FUNDRAISING EFFORTS A HUGE BOOST FOR CURRAJONG

PARKES Christian School recently took time out of their busy schedule to pose for a photo and discuss their recent effort at the Moomba Birdman Rally.

“We have $1400 raised for Currajong Disability Services (CDS),” said Design and Technology teacher Jason Wynstra, one of the driving forces behind the PCS effort.

“While we didn’t defend our title this time it was an incredible performance.

“The distance was short of what the students were hoping for, but it is the experience that really mattered,” he said.

“Along the way we raised funds to support a charity of our choice and this year we raised over $1400 for Currajong Disability Services with the support of our school and the Birdman community,” he said.

“It is really important for our students to have a range of experiences and to understand that there is more to life than the little bubble that can be created at school,” Mr Wynstra said.

“Students working on the project have already evaluated our flight and are developing concepts for the Parkes Flyer 3.”

From left, Nicholas Strudwick, Joel Hall-Matthews, Jesse Magill, Phil Seeley (the flyer), Ethan Peters, Elly Collins, Madelynne Capple, Chelsea Johnson, Mikeely Bermingham, Michelle Mulligan, Joshua Davison and Mark Allen from the Parkes Christian School.
From left, Nicholas Strudwick, Joel Hall-Matthews, Jesse Magill, Phil Seeley (the flyer), Ethan Peters, Elly Collins, Madelynne Capple, Chelsea Johnson, Mikeely Bermingham, Michelle Mulligan, Joshua Davison and Mark Allen from the Parkes Christian School.

Parkes Christian School’s journey to the Moomba Birdman Rally has been hailed a success with $1400 raised for Currajong Disability Services (CDS).

In blustery, unpredictable conditions, the title for the longest flight on March 11 became a virtual lottery, however the Parkes Christian School crew did well to manage five metres from a standing start into the Yarra River.

Design and Technology teacher Jason Wynstra said this distance was short of what the students were hoping for, but it is the experience that really mattered.

“The flight of our craft the Parkes Flyer 2 was forced into a stall by a gust of wind which was accentuated when our support crew had to let go at the end of the platform,” Mr Wynstra said.

“Although we lost our momentum, the aircraft levelled off and gently descended into the Yarra performing exceptionally well.

“With our charity points added we achieved a very respectable 14 metres.”

Although the school wasn’t able to defend its title won last year, Mr Wynstra said the experience is not all about winning a trophy or recognition for the school.

“Along the way we raised funds to support a charity of our choice and this year we raised $1400 for Currajong Disability Services with the support of our school and the Birdman community,” he said.

“Students worked alongside different community groups to realise their design; they test and analyse, and make modifications to create the best possible craft for the competition

“The way the students worked together in a real-world, collaborative way was fantastic.

“And seeing them bond throughout the process and over the weekend through their shared experiences is what makes it all worthwhile for me as an educator.”

Pilot Phil Seeley was very impressed by the construction of the ‘Parkes Flyer 2’.

“It was lots of fun. I know how difficult it is to balance all the bits of a glider, it still amazes me how the hang gliding manufactures make them work so well,” Mr Seeley said.

Parkes Christian School is very focussed on providing students with experiences that are relevant to the real world.

The Moomba Birdman Rally is just one way that students are able to experience this, and it is a project the school is committed to in the future.

“It is really important for our students to have a range of experiences and to understand that there is more to life than the little bubble that can be created at school,” Mr Wynstra said.

“Students working on the project have already evaluated our flight and are developing concepts for the Parkes Flyer 3.”

*Story courtesy of Parkes Champion Post.

Trilbie Bermingham getting her locks chopped off
Trilbie Bermingham getting her locks chopped off

Friends, family and many of Currajong Disability Service’s clients and support workers met up at the Parkes Hotel on Friday night to cheer on Trilbie Bermingham as she shaved her head for an important cause.

The Currajong Disability support worker decided to raise funds for Leukemia and lose her locks as part of the World’s Greatest Shave after her dad lost his best friend, Henry Baigent, to leukemia a couple of years ago.

“I also want to raise awareness that children with Down Syndrome have a higher risk of leukemia,” she said.

The Leukaemia Foundation’s World’s Greatest Shave began back in 1998.

Twenty years on it remains one of Australia’s biggest fundraising events.

“People of all ages shave, colour or wax, cut ponytails, banish beards and trim top knots,” said Trilbie.

“I decided to go the whole way and shave mine.”

The goal set by Triblie for fund raising through World’s Greatest Shave was $700.

At the beginning of the month, she had $570 in the kitty.

By the time of the Shave, she had raised over $1760, with more donations coming in on the night, as well as the proceed of the raffle which consised of a number of donated prizes.

Trilbie’s long dark hair was initially trimmed then shaved in front of a crowd of more than 30 people by Shonell Redfern.

“I’d like to thank everyone for their love and support throughout my fundraising efforts,” she said.

Although research is improving survival, sadly an Australian loses their life to blood cancer every two hours, claiming more lives than breast cancer and melanoma.

One person is diagnosed every 41 minutes.

For more information on how to donate or get involved go to www.worldsgreatestshave.com

*Story courtesy of the Parkes Champion Post.

Thomas Davis playing volleyball.
Thomas Davis playing volleyball.

THIS year Currajong Disability Services celebrates its Silver 25th anniversary and we couldn’t be more excited. From our humble beginnings in 1993 (yes David Parker was here then as well) through to where we are today, Currajong has a rich history which all current and former staff and clients should be very proud of.

We have changed logos, merged with Westview, added more residences, attracted more clients and employed extra staff. As a result, we have become a registered charity with a significant turnover and we continue to go from strength to strength. Most importantly, we have provided a life with opportunities for our clients and continue to do so.

Now 25 years later we are looking at commemorating our anniversary with a range of activities between now and Christmas. Already there have been a number of great ideas tossed around and we want to hear from you! Already we have discussed an Open Day, markets, concerts, CDS themed calendars, client cookbooks or photo books and fundraising events and that’s just the start of it!

We want to hear from everyone from clients and their families to staff and board members so we can make this year and our 25 year anniversary the best and biggest event ever! Drop us a line at mail@currajong.org.au

Currajong Disability Services mission is to offer innovative, person centred disability and community services to the Parkes, Forbes and Lachlan region. The organisation has been delivering services since 1993 and is governed by a volunteer committee.

CDS has 35 employees to deliver services and these include community participation and transition to Work Post School programs as well as Learning and Living Skill Day Programs, HACC and Respite Services. CDS delivers high quality locally based services to a wide range of clients from all socio-economic groups and boasts above average family participation.

Kyal Sauer, Jamie Cook, Rhyse Forrestal and Jannette Lovett.
Kyal Sauer, Jamie Cook, Rhyse Forrestal and Jannette Lovett.

FOR the sixth time in seven years Currajong Disability Services have taken out overall honours in the Western Region Annual Swimming Carnival at Parkes Swimming Pool.

A strong representation meant there were an impressive 105 nominations in total with entrants coming from as far afield as Temora and Cowra, who were the 2017 defending champions. Yet it was Currajong lead admirably by Ian “Thorpedo” Kaupke and Condo CDS representative Tim McDonald that dominated early with some impressive performances from Jamie Cook also.

Chris Spicer, Jaime Porter, Tara Dennis and Jay Crouch also put in some strong performances while Kyal Sauer and Thomas Davis were also competitive.

“CDS went very well and competed in the right spirit,” said Activity Co-ordinator and carnival organiser, Currajong’s Indigo Kriedemann.

“Every competitor was a credit to themselves and their organisation.

“Each year we see fantastic friendships and relationships develop and we were delighted to continue that with the other organisations and clients again this year,” said Indigo.

The day also featured novelty events and a relay as well as a barbecue as a big turn out arrived for the carnival in what is one of the flagship events on the regional calendar.

“Everyone had a go which is all you can ask, from competitors to volunteers,” said Indigo.

“We can’t thank everyone enough.

“Our volunteers especially from CDS were great and we couldn’t do it without them.”

Debbie Hamilton with John Dwyer and Ross McCulloch of Condobolin CDS
Debbie Hamilton with John Dwyer and Ross McCulloch of Condobolin CDS

THEY say all good things must end and for Currajong Disability Services employer Debbie Hamilton, that day is Thursday March 8.

Debbie or Deb as she is known to many staff and clients, is a hugely popular figure across Condobolin, Currajong and among many communities in the Central West. In her eleven years with CDS, Deb has touched the lives of many and her “roll-up-the-sleeves” attitude has aided many and inspired more. Yet she remains as humble as ever.

“To me, it’s always been all about the clients,” she said.

“Seeing what they have achieved, watching them grow and gain confidence as they interact more with the community.

“Those are the important things and the things I will hold onto as they give me a real buzz and have given me tremendous job satisfaction over the years,” said Deb.

“It’s those little things as well as all the friendships and hoping you made a difference that you take away from experiences such as this.”

While Deb’s new role at Condobolin Public School as a Teacher’s Learning Support Officer has some parallels to her role at CDS, she will still not be completely lost to Currajong and has vowed to pop in from time to time and see how all gang are getting along.

“I know Sharon Bevill is more than capable and already she is doing a great job,” said Deb.

“She has it in her, like me and I know all the clients here in Condo are in great hands.

“The clients are the reason we get up every morning!”

Deb has had nearly 38 years in aged and disability care and says that while she will miss certain elements of disability care she is now in a rare position to tap into something she hasn’t done before and that is helping children more directly.

“I am really excited about the new role and I can really help the next generation on the ground,” she said.

“It’s a great school and filled with great people.

“As the CDS logo says, it’s all about providing a life with opportunities!”

All the best Deb! We will miss you and thanks for your service

Many CDS clients have been spending plenty of time in the pool for the carnival
Many CDS clients have been spending plenty of time in the pool for the carnival

THE annual Currajong Disability Services Swimming Carnival is on Wednesday March 7 and it promises to be an action packed program.

The event will run from 9am to 3pm and the day chock full of races with participants from as far afield as Temora, Orange, Cowra, Forbes and Dubbo.

“We run this event every year and it is always one of the most popular events on the calendar,” said Direct Care Team Leader Indigo Kriedemann.

“Participation levels have been growing every year which is another promising sign.

“We welcome all families to the event and appreciate all the contributions thus far to make this day a reality.”

Canteen facilities will be operational on the day while other activities will also be held on the day to ensure all participants get the most out of the day.

“We run inclusive programs so there is something for everyone,” said Indigo.

“We encourage everyone to have a go at the range of things we offer.

“It will be a memorable day – it always is,” she said.

“Most of all we want everyone to have fun,” she said.

“At the end of the day that’s what it’s all about!”

Watch this page for further updates and we hope to see you there!

Currajong Disability Services Swimming Carnival – Wednesday March 7 @ Parkes Swimming Pool.

9am-3pm.

For further info contact CDS on 02 6368 4713 or email mail@currajong.org.au

Clients at CDS loved the didgeridoo workshop
Clients at CDS loved the didgeridoo workshop

LAST week Allan McKenzie ran a hugely popular and successful two-day didgeridoo workshop at Currajong Disability Services in Parkes.

The workshop, in line with indigenous tradition and custom, was open to men only as the didgeridoo is seen a phallic extension of man. Men, as per indigenous culture are also the only one’s allowed to play the instrument.

“The participants had an incredible time,” said Allan McKenzie, workshop co-ordinator.

“Everyone embraced the course and we were extremely impressed with the visions of many.

“We can’t wait to come back again and maybe take them out to Country and do some more work with this amazing group,” he said.

HISTORY OF THE DIDGERIDOO

According to Wikipedia, the didgeridoo (a wind instrument developed by Indigenous Australians), was potentially first created 1500 years ago in northern Australia. It is sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or “drone” pipe. Musicologists classify it as a brassaerophone.

There are no reliable sources stating the didgeridoo’s exact age. Archaeological studies of rock art in Northern Australia suggest that the people of the Kakadu region of the Northern Territory have been using the didgeridoo for less than 1,000 years, based on the dating of paintings on cave walls and shelters from this period.[2]A clear rock painting in Ginga Wardelirrhmeng, on the northern edge of the Arnhem Land plateau, from the freshwater period[3] (that had begun 1500 years ago)[4] shows a didgeridoo player and two songmen participating in an Ubarr Ceremony.[5]

A modern didgeridoo is usually cylindrical or conical, and can measure anywhere from 1 to 3 m (3 to 10 ft) long. Most are around 1.2 m (4 ft) long. Generally, the longer the instrument, the lower its pitch or key. However, flared instruments play a higher pitch than unflared instruments of the same length.

Traditionally and originally, the didgeridoo was primarily played as an accompaniment to ceremonial dancing and singing. However, it was also common for didgeridoos to be played for solo or recreational purposes outside of ceremonial gatherings. For surviving Aboriginal groups of northern Australia, the didgeridoo is still an integral part of ceremonial life, as it accompanies singers and dancers in cultural ceremonies that continue. Today, the majority of didgeridoo playing is for recreational purposes in both Indigenous Australian communities and elsewhere around the world.

Pair sticks, sometimes called clapsticks or bilma, establish the beat for the songs during ceremonies. The rhythm of the didgeridoo and the beat of the clapsticks are precise, and these patterns have been handed down for many generations. In the Wangga genre, the song-man starts with vocals and then introduces blima to the accompaniment of didgeridoo.[19]

Traditionally, only men play the didgeridoo and sing during ceremonial occasions, although both men and women may dance. Female didgeridoo players do exist, but their playing takes place in an informal context and is not specifically encouraged by Aboriginal elders.