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Sue Maxwell volunteered at the event along with CDS recruit Indigo Kriedamann
Sue Maxwell volunteered at the event along with CDS recruit Indigo Kriedamann

WITH the dust well and truly settled since the inaugural Day On The Green Currajong Disability Services Fundraiser at the Railway Bowling Club in Parkes, it can be confirmed that the event was an outstanding success!

The fundraiser, which was the brainchild of ex-CDS employee Lilian Thomson, was designed to raise vital funds for a new care chair at the CDS Parkes HQ. Lilian has a grandson at Currajong, Cooper, who would be a direct recipient of such a lavish asset. For those who don’t know, a care chair provides respite for wheelchair based clients who often spend hours each day in their wheelchairs.

“We are over the moon with this result and can’t thank everyone enough,” said CDS Communications and Marketing Co-ordinator Dane Millerd.

“Until now we only had one care chair between three wheelchair based clients so now with a second chair we will be able to offer more to our clients.

“It will undoubtedly improve their quality of life especially now they can use the chairs daily and everyone gets a turn which we struggled with in the past.”

With the care chair valued at $4600, the Parkes community mucked in with some tremendous contributions and donations – an amazing effort for this time of the year.

“I know I speak for everyone at Currajong when I say thank you to the Railway Bowling Club Parkes, Lilian Thomson and all the volunteers who made this day possible!”

“It was a fantastic day today and hopefully we see it all happening again sooner than later.

“We can’t put into words the difference this makes!

Tim Wheeler had a ball at the DOTG fundraiser for CDS
Tim Wheeler had a ball at the DOTG fundraiser for CDS

CLOSE to 300 people turned out last Saturday for the inaugural Railway Bowling Club Day On The Green fundraiser for Currajong Disability Services.

The event, which was the brainchild of Lilian Thomson and the Railway Bowling Club, was planned to help Currajong raise much needed funds for a Care Chair valued at approximately $4500.

At last count there was over $5000 raised meaning that the objective on the day was well and truly achieved to the delight of all concerned.

“Currajong currently has three wheelchair bound clients and only one Care Chair so now we can arrange a second one for our clients,” Currajong CEO Jeff Evans said.

“We are extremely grateful to all those who contributed and attended and can’t put into words what this means for us and our clients who will directly benefit from the overwhelming generosity from within the community.

“The spirit among the Parkes district and surrounds to turn up and support us is fantastic.”

The day featured a who’s who of the local music scene with Birdie and Georgie Sideris, Chris Orr, Jordie Dwyer, Twiggy McGirr and Tommy and Holly Orr lighting up the huge crowd.

There was an auction on the day with the flagship item – Winx memorabilia going for a tidy sum as well as an array of lucky door prizes to keep the masses interested.

For Marketing and Communications Co-ordinator Dane Millerd, the day couldn’t have gone any better.

“I really must thank Lilian and the team at the Railway Bowling Club as well as Sue Maxwell and our own Indigo Kriedemann for their tireless efforts to make this day a reality,” he said.

“Lilian especially went above and beyond the call of duty.

“She is a proud member of the extended CDS family and her dedication will see her grandson Cooper directly benefit from the Care Chair and help improve not just his quality of life but that of our other clients.

“From everyone at CDS – thank you.”

After the overhwleming success of the inaugural Day On The Green the general consensus among those that attended was unanimous – When is it on again?

Watch this space!

Check out the gallery here – https://www.parkeschampionpost.com.au/story/5207447/day-on-the-green-photos/?cs=1874

The Parkes Railway Bowling Club will host its own mini Day on the Green to help out Currajong Disability Services.

DONATIONS POURING IN!

DONATIONS are pouring in for the DAY ON THE GREEN at Railway Bowling Club in Parkes on Saturday February 3. The event, which is a special fundraising day for Currajong Disability Services at the Railway Bowling Club, has attracted a number of donations and sponsorship from many businesses with more keen to sign up.

From Twiggy and Jordan Dwyer to Chris Orr, Birdie and Georgie Sideris as well as Tommy and Holly Orr, there will be the crème de la crème of Parkes music on display for all to see.

The event will include a BBQ, raffles and lucky door prizes and great music!

Children are welcome between 4pm-8pm with the event to finish somewhere around 11pm.

Bring a blanket!

THE Currajong Disability Services Swimming Carnival is on again in what promises to be another exciting day on the activities calendar.

Team Leader of Direct Care and Activities Indigo Kriedemann said that the carnival is always a popular event and often well-supported.

“Every year the carnival proves to be one of the successes of the calendar year,” she said.

“All of our clients enjoy a swim and getting into the spirit of the day.

“We hope the event is supported again this year!”

The annual Currajong Disability Services Swimming Carnival commences at 9am and will finish at 3pm.

There will be a number of events on the day and if previous years are anything to go by it will be one of the CDS flagship events of the year.

“Our clients love swimming and for many it is an important part of their routine,” said Indigo.

“It is great to see them participate and gain more water confidence.

“We can’t wait to do it all again and connect with clients and their families.”

Indigo Kriedemann with social organiser Lilian Thomson and Tony Latter from Railway Bowling Club, Parkes who are kindly hosting a fundraiser for CDS on February 3.
Indigo Kriedemann with social organiser Lilian Thomson and Tony Latter from Railway Bowling Club, Parkes who are kindly hosting a fundraiser for CDS on February 3.

MARK down Saturday February 3 in your calendars all family, friends and client! A Day On the Green will showcase the best musicians in Parkes as they headline a special fundraising day for Currajong Disability Services at the Railway Bowling Club.

From Twiggy and Jordan Dwyer to Chris Orr, Birdie and Georgie Sideris as well as Tommy and Holly Orr, there will be the crème de la crème of Parkes music on display for all to see.

“We wanted to do something for Currajong as they do so much for so many – including my grandson Cooper,” said Lilian Thomson, organiser of the CDS fundraiser.

“We want to help CDS raise necessary funds for a new Care Chair as they try to raise money for a second chair.

“Such an asset makes a big difference to wheelchair based clients at CDS such as Amanda, Wade and Cooper and a second chair will allow them to utilise them every day,” said Lilian.

For Marketing and Communications co-ordinator Dane Millerd, the day is also important as it allows more people to not only support CDS but learn about what they do and are trying to achieve.

“CDS prides itself on being the leading NDIS Disability Services Provider in the region and being able to raise funds for such a worthwhile asset further establishes this,” he said.

“We have taken big steps forward in the past 12 months and are extremely grateful for Lilian and her team for thinking of us and staging this tremendous event.

“It is these small but significant acts of kindness from the Parkes and surrounding communities that have helped CDS to the esteemed position it sits today so thank you to everyone involved.”

The event will include a BBQ, raffles and lucky door prizes and great music!

Children are welcome between 4pm-8pm with the event to finish somewhere around 11pm.

Bring a blanket!

John Dwyer of Condo CDS near the Christmas tree in the middle of town
John Dwyer of Condo CDS near the Christmas tree in the middle of town

 

 

To All our clients, families and friends,

 

At CDS we have thoroughly enjoyed another productive and fun-filled year with you all watching our clients grow and learn new skills. We have welcomed new participants as well as staff and gone from strength to strength.

 

We have had Charles Hamer move into his own place, Tommy D landed a job with the Green Army, Rhyse lit up the stage with Parkes M&D and we have planted seeds for the carob tree initiative and jujube farm. We have also relaunched the paper shredding business, welcomed a new CEO – Jeff Evans, farewelled some much-loved staff and Martin Bates has devoted his musical expertise by adding drum workshops to the activities program.

 

We have provided over 7,500 lunches and contributed approximately $3.6 million to the regional economy and we have established stronger links in Forbes and Condobolin especially as we expand into 2018.

 

There’s been the launch of the NDIS and our CDS Sewing Group has turned heads throughout the Central West with some quality quilts having donated to Parkes Hospital.

 

It has been an amazing year and from everyone at Currajong Disability Services in Parkes – have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Tara Dennis with Bonnita Brady and Dan Jones.
Tara Dennis with Bonnita Brady and Dan Jones.

In the second half of the 20th century, we came to accept that in certain cases we should avoid deliberately hurtful language. While many deride political correctness for going too far, its initial aim to establish non-hateful language was, and still is, admirable.

In the early 20th century, “moron” was a medical term for someone with a mental age of between eight and 12. “Mongol” was a person with Down syndrome, and also was indirectly a slur on people from Mongolia, some of whose features were supposed to resemble those with Down syndrome. “Retarded” described someone mentally, socially or physically less advanced than their chronological age.

We know these terms now primarily as pejoratives. “Mongol”, following the Australian tendency to form diminutives, has even given us “mong”, meaning someone who is stupid or behaves as such. Yet there is also a consensus such language is unacceptable. How did we get here?

The path to dignified language

In December 1948, the United Nations passed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Affirming the dignity of all humans, Article 1 of this landmark document states:

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2 goes on to specify this should apply

without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

The declaration, prompted by the dehumanising events of the second world war, soon led to concerted initiatives to avoid hurtful and denigrating language.

Race and ethnicity was the first area to be addressed in Australia, where the philosophy of respect was enshrined in the Racial Discrimination Act of 1975. This included the currently controversial section 18C, which made it an offence to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate someone else on the basis of race or nationality.


Read more – What is Section 18C and why do some politicians want it changed?


In the 1980s the scope was expanded in Australia to include gender and sexuality, with the legitimisation of terms like “queer”, and an increasing range of different kinds of sexuality now evident in the LGBTQI designations.

The third big change involved the language for people with disabilities, whether cognitive or physical. Here the English vocabulary was full of terms that mixed description with pejorative overtones.

People first

Words like “deaf”, “blind”, “dumb” and “lame” are not only descriptions of physical ability and disability, but are commonly used in negative ways. For instance, “deaf as a post”, “blind Freddie”.

We have now moved away from such language. Especially unacceptable are nouns like “retard” or adjectives like “demented”. In their place we have the principle of people first. The person and the disability are separated.

Instead of a phrase like “demented person” we have “person with dementia” or “person living with dementia”. The New South Wales Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care has a list of such terms.

We should avoid terms that suggest deficit in a negative way, such as “disabled”, “invalid”, “retarded”, “handicap”, “spastic” and “cripple”. We should also avoid terms that explicitly specify limitation like “confined” (say, to a wheelchair). “Suffering from” is to be eschewed for the same reason, since it suggests the person is passive and incapable.


Read more – Redefining the (able) body: disabled performers make their presence felt at the Fringe


A number of paraphrases allow us to avoid sensitive terms. Instead of “blind” we have “visually impaired”. People are not “disabled” but “differently abled”.

Some of these terms can go too far and are effectively euphemisms because they sound overdone and excessively delicate, like “intellectually challenged”.

It is preferable to use language that doesn’t exclude people with these conditions from society. A good example of such inclusive language is “ambulant toilet”, often found in airports and public places, which simply indicates the toilet is suitable for anyone able to walk.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 consolidated these issues in Australian legislation, which now forms part of an expanding suite of anti-discrimination legislation both here and overseas.

Talking to someone with a disability

A general guideline for talking to someone with a certain condition is to ask that person how they wish to be described. In some cases, words like “deaf” have been reclaimed by bodies like the National Association of the Deaf in the US. The presence of the capital letter legitimises the term’s use, so long as it is done respectfully. In a similar way, various gender groups have reclaimed the word “queer”, and the fact they use it licenses others to do so too.

The requirement for respectful and considerate speech is not just a matter of good manners; it has teeth. Governments, education systems, companies, societies and other bodies often have guidelines for language use for people with disabilities.


Read more – Political correctness: its origins and the backlash against it


The US National Institutes of Health recommends “intellectually and developmentally disabled” or “IDD” for people with Down syndrome. Bodies like Dementia Australia have language recommendations.

Institutions and governments can apply a variety of sanctions to people who violate this principle in a persistent and hurtful way. These principles are now common in the English-speaking world and countries of the European Union, especially as enshrined in its Charter of Fundamental Rights.

In little more than a generation and half, we have become a more caring and inclusive society, and one much more aware of the importance of avoiding hurtful language. We don’t always get the expression right. But we are getting better at seeing the effect of what we say and write from the point of view of others.

CDS representative David Parker with staff from Parkes Woolworths.
CDS representative David Parker with staff from Parkes Woolworths.

WOOLWORTHS DONATES SPREAD TO CDS FOR XMAS

Woolworths Parkes has kindly donated an array of food and beverages to Currajong Disability Services as a way to say thank you for the outstanding relationship forged between the two organisations especially over the past 12 months.

Woolwortths Parkes has kindly donated an array of food and beverages to Currajong Disability Services as a way to say thank you for the outstanding relationship forged between the two organisations especially over the past 12 months.

CDS representative David Parker thanked Kerrie and her team from Parkes Woolworths for the kind donation and said CDS was humbled by the generosity of the organisation.

“Thanks again to Parkes Woolworths for everything they have done and we can’t wait to see where this relationship takes us into the future,” said David Parker.

“At CDS we strive to be active in the community, support local business and we welcome ideas.

“On behalf of everyone at CDS thank you to all our partners and Merry Xmas!”

Currajong Disability Services spends $80,000 on groceries each year, serves clients approximately 7500 lunches over the same period and injects around $3.6 million into the regional economy per annum.

These are significant numbers that will only grow as the organisation also grows and attracts more clients and staff since the implementation of the NDIS in the Central West.

Jye Jeffery, Cherie Lovett, Rebecca Walsh (Ronald McDonald House Executive Officer), Dearnne Callaghan and Shannon Miller with the quilts they made at CDS for the donation.
Jye Jeffery, Cherie Lovett, Rebecca Walsh (Ronald McDonald House Executive Officer), Dearnne Callaghan and Shannon Miller with the quilts they made at CDS for the donation.

EARLIER this week staff and clients from Currajong Disability Services donated hand-made quilts to Ronald McDonald House in Orange.

It is the second time this year the group have donated the fruits of their hard work to a reputable organisation (the other being Parkes Hospital) and Executive Officer Rebecca Walsh was ecstatic with the gesture.

“We are extremely grateful to Currajong Disability Services for their dedication and donation to our organisation,” she said.

“It is tremendous they have selected Ronald McDonald House and have decided to partner up with us.

“We can’t thank them enough.”

Since its inception, Parkes residents have relied heavily on Ronald McDonald House with Parkes being the single biggest contributor with some 45 families, 68 visits and 323 nights spent by Parkes residents at Ronald McDonald House.

Condobolin with 42 visits over 115 nights and Forbes with 43 visits and 143 nights spent at the Orange house also shows how important the resources are to families in the Central West.

“Ronald McDonald House caters to mental health, maternity, special care nursery and paediatrics,” said Ms Walsh.

“As you can appreciate, we attract a number of people throughout the calendar year.

“Donations like today while small, are all important for it is the little pieces of generosity that make the difference in the end,” she said.

Ronald McDonald House Charities® (RMHC®) is an independent charity that helps families of seriously ill children. They help keep families together and close to the care their child needs.

The cornerstone program of RMHC, the Ronald McDonald House®, provides a ‘home away from home’ for families of seriously ill children being treated at nearby hospitals.  In 1981 the first Australian Ronald McDonald House opened in Sydney’s Camperdown. There are now 16 Ronald McDonald Houses in Australia and more than 360 houses worldwide.

More info can be obtained at – https://www.rmhc.org.au/

Ross McCulloch standing by the pool on IDPwD in Forbes
Ross McCulloch standing by the pool on IDPwD in Forbes

STAFF and clients of Currajong Disability Services recently participated in International Day for People with Disability (IDPwD) at the Forbes Olympic pool with a who’s who of disability service providers from around the district, their staff, clients and families.

The event, which was run by Forbes Shire Council, included a BBQ, games and a variety of other fun activities that kept everyone entertained.

“From all reports, our participants had a great day,” said CDS Marketing and Communications rep Dane Millerd.

“We’d like to thank Forbes Shire Council for including us and staging such a successful day.

“It is important we recognise people with disabilities not just on days like today but that we support, encourage and celebrate them every day.”

IDPwD is a United Nations sanctioned day that is celebrated internationally.

It aims to increase public awareness, understanding and acceptance of people with disability and celebrate the achievements and contributions of people with disability.

The Australian Government has been supporting IDPwD since 1996 and provides funds to promote and raise awareness of the day around Australia.

Each year the UN announces a theme to observe for International Day of People with Disability. The annual theme provides an overarching focus on how society can strive for inclusivity through the removal of physical, technological and attitudinal barriers for people with disability. This has been occurring since 1992 when the General Assembly proclaimed 3 December as the International Day of Disabled Persons.