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Jye Jeffery, Cherie Lovett, Rebecca Walsh (Ronald McDonald House Executive Officer), Dearnne Callaghan and Shannon Miller with the quilts they made at CDS for the donation.
Jye Jeffery, Cherie Lovett, Rebecca Walsh (Ronald McDonald House Executive Officer), Dearnne Callaghan and Shannon Miller with the quilts they made at CDS for the donation.

EARLIER this week staff and clients from Currajong Disability Services donated hand-made quilts to Ronald McDonald House in Orange.

It is the second time this year the group have donated the fruits of their hard work to a reputable organisation (the other being Parkes Hospital) and Executive Officer Rebecca Walsh was ecstatic with the gesture.

“We are extremely grateful to Currajong Disability Services for their dedication and donation to our organisation,” she said.

“It is tremendous they have selected Ronald McDonald House and have decided to partner up with us.

“We can’t thank them enough.”

Since its inception, Parkes residents have relied heavily on Ronald McDonald House with Parkes being the single biggest contributor with some 45 families, 68 visits and 323 nights spent by Parkes residents at Ronald McDonald House.

Condobolin with 42 visits over 115 nights and Forbes with 43 visits and 143 nights spent at the Orange house also shows how important the resources are to families in the Central West.

“Ronald McDonald House caters to mental health, maternity, special care nursery and paediatrics,” said Ms Walsh.

“As you can appreciate, we attract a number of people throughout the calendar year.

“Donations like today while small, are all important for it is the little pieces of generosity that make the difference in the end,” she said.

Ronald McDonald House Charities® (RMHC®) is an independent charity that helps families of seriously ill children. They help keep families together and close to the care their child needs.

The cornerstone program of RMHC, the Ronald McDonald House®, provides a ‘home away from home’ for families of seriously ill children being treated at nearby hospitals.  In 1981 the first Australian Ronald McDonald House opened in Sydney’s Camperdown. There are now 16 Ronald McDonald Houses in Australia and more than 360 houses worldwide.

More info can be obtained at – https://www.rmhc.org.au/

Ross McCulloch standing by the pool on IDPwD in Forbes
Ross McCulloch standing by the pool on IDPwD in Forbes

STAFF and clients of Currajong Disability Services recently participated in International Day for People with Disability (IDPwD) at the Forbes Olympic pool with a who’s who of disability service providers from around the district, their staff, clients and families.

The event, which was run by Forbes Shire Council, included a BBQ, games and a variety of other fun activities that kept everyone entertained.

“From all reports, our participants had a great day,” said CDS Marketing and Communications rep Dane Millerd.

“We’d like to thank Forbes Shire Council for including us and staging such a successful day.

“It is important we recognise people with disabilities not just on days like today but that we support, encourage and celebrate them every day.”

IDPwD is a United Nations sanctioned day that is celebrated internationally.

It aims to increase public awareness, understanding and acceptance of people with disability and celebrate the achievements and contributions of people with disability.

The Australian Government has been supporting IDPwD since 1996 and provides funds to promote and raise awareness of the day around Australia.

Each year the UN announces a theme to observe for International Day of People with Disability. The annual theme provides an overarching focus on how society can strive for inclusivity through the removal of physical, technological and attitudinal barriers for people with disability. This has been occurring since 1992 when the General Assembly proclaimed 3 December as the International Day of Disabled Persons.

Jannette Lovett, John Carey, Alex Lee, Shane Spicer and Tim Wheeler

ALEX Lee has only been at Currajong Disability Services for 18 months but if ever there was a time to mention quality over quantity then this would be it. You see Alex is a favourite among clients and staff alike not just because she is good at what she does but because she is passionate about her job, her workmates and participants. She isn’t just a carer in name she actually cares and it isn’t just a job – its a calling.

For those who don’t know, Alex comes from a family of health professionals and carers including her mother who still works in the industry in Newcastle.

“I finish up next Wednesday November 15 and plan to move back to Newcastle to work as a carer but also special ed teaching,” said Alex.

“It is also a family and lifestyle choice.

“That said I will miss everyone – especially the clients at the houses. The rapport I built with them makes them my pseudo family and I will never forget the time I had with them.”

The 27-year-old spent most of her time at Cecile Street and it is her particular fondness for the residents of Cecile she will find most difficult to walk away from when she hangs up her hat for the last time next week.

“CDS is brilliant and I would recommend it to anyone looking for work in the disability sector,” said Alex.

“It is an exciting time to be involved in the organisation and industry and CDS is making all the right moves – especially with day program options.

“So if you are passionate about support work and caring put your hand up to volunteer and get involved.”

And after ten years in the industry it appears Alex has no plans to change careers anytime soon.

“I really enjoyed getting closer to residents whilst doing home care and growing up with a “respite” family helped with that,” she said.

“CDS and disability care will always remain a big part of who I am.

“Thank you again to everyone who has helped and supported me!”

CDS Carer Trilbie Bermingham (front left) with Ian O'Brien (back middle) with Ashley Stronach (reading).
CDS Carer Trilbie Bermingham (front left) with Ian O'Brien (back middle) with Ashley Stronach (reading).

National Carers Week (October 15-21) recognises a special group of people who are often taken for granted.

Carers are the people who look after our mothers and fathers, our grandparents and sometimes, unfortunately, our children – they hold a very important place in any family who rely on their time, support and generous nature.

To many they are angels and at Currajong Disability Services that’s how we see them.

According to www.carersweek.com.au “National Carers Week is about recognising and celebrating the outstanding contribution Australia’s 2.7 million unpaid carers make to our nation” and this week is an opportunity to raise awareness and recognise carers and those in caring roles.

“Without carers organisations like us here at Currajong Disability Services would struggle,” said CEO Jeff Evans.

“This week is a chance to show appreciation for these special people and acknowledge their outstanding contributions.

“I know many others within our industry would echo my sentiments when I say how vital carers are and for that on behalf of CDS I would like to say thank you,” Jeff said.

Currajong has two extremely active and respected carer support groups – Currajong Carers Support Group (CCSG) and Currajong Autism and Special Needs Group (CASNG).

According to Jeff, not only is what they do for clients and their families essential from a care perspective but they also provide a platform for all parties including carers to share experiences in a positive and supportive environment.

“The work Kitty Dwyer and Lethe Rawson have done for Currajong Carers Support Group and likewise Angela Wilson for the Currajong Autism and Special Needs Group has been incredible,” he said.

“The positive impact on other families and carers from their dedication is evident via the popularity, growth and testimonials I have received about these two groups.

“I would like to also take this opportunity to thank and commend all concerned from these organisations for their efforts.”

Carers make an enormous contribution to our communities as well as our national economy.

Should all carers decide to stop performing their caring role, it would cost the country $60.3 billion per year to replace those supports – that’s over $1 billion per week.

National Carers Week provides you with a chance to show your appreciation and learn about carers and caring in Australia.

Say thank you to a carer today!

John Carey and Tara Dennis at Pink Ribbon Day at CDS
John Carey and Tara Dennis at Pink Ribbon Day at CDS

CURRAJONG Disability Services (CDS) celebrated Pink Ribbon Day this week while also raising some funds for a worthy cause – women’s cancer.

A regular event on the CDS calendar, Pink Ribbon Day, generated plenty of interest again this year and was well supported by everyone.

Dane Millerd, Marketing and Communications Co-ordinator, said it was a great day and everyone really got involved and supported it.

“Pink Ribbon Day is an important day on the calendar and it is a special day here at Currajong,” Dane said.

“Pink Ribbon day allows us all to recognise and support the special women in our lives who have been touched by cancer – they are our mothers, sisters, grandmothers and daughters and it’s important we all rally around them.”

Every day in Australia, around 50 women are told they have breast or a gynaecological cancer.

Sadly, every day around 12 Australian women will die from a women’s cancer.

The five year survival rate for breast cancer increased by 17% from 1982 to 2012, and the five year survival rate for women with a gynaecological cancer increased by 7% in the same period.

This increase in survivors of breast and gynaecological cancers is thanks to advancements in research and prevention that you help fund by supporting Cancer Council’s Pink Ribbon.

Breast and gynaecological cancers unfortunately touch everyone’s life in one form or another, either directly or through the experience of family and friends.

The money you raise will help Cancer Council fight cancer through prevention programs, support services and world-class cancer research.

Donate today – www.pinkribbon.com.au/about-us/how-your-money-helps/

A crowd in excess of 200 people packed the Parkes Services Club for the Henry Awards recently
A crowd in excess of 200 people packed the Parkes Services Club for the Henry Awards recently

Currajong Disability Services came up short in a strong field of finalists for the Excellence in Social Enterprise category at the recent Parkes Business Chamber Henry Awards on Friday evening October 20.

The field, which also consisted of Parkes Shire Food and Neighbourhood Central, was tight having been reduced from eight nominees to three finalists only a month before.

Parkes Shire Food Service was a deserving winner on the night which was recognition of some outstanding work and initiatives undertaken by one of the regions most reputable organisations.

For CDS however the thrill of being among it was certainly reward enough.

“I’d like to thank the Parkes Chamber for recognising us and being so supportive as well as congratulate Parkes Shire Food Service on the outstanding win,” said Dane Millerd.

“We wouldn’t be here now without the efforts of so many at CDS.

“We are honoured to have even been mentioned.”

More info here – http://www.parkeschampionpost.com.au/…/businesses-shine-a…/…

Debbie Hewitt wears many hats at CDS including that ofTeam Leader New Business
Debbie Hewitt wears many hats at CDS including that of Team Leader New Business

STAFF PROFILE

DEBBIE HEWITT, BUSINESS TEAM LEADER

Time in role – 4.5 years

What do you like the most about CDS and your role?  Seeing high functioning clients progress.

Why are you working in this industry? I was a teacher’s aide so this role in some ways is in a similar field.

If you weren’t in this industry what would you be doing?  On a deserted island.

If you were CEO for a day what would you change? All the things we hope will eventuate.

Email your photos and stories to – dane.millerd@currajong.org.au for our next weekly newsletter email.

Deadline is 10am each Thursday.

The weekly email newsletter is designed to keep everyone abreast of events and changes within the organisation in relation to the NDIS and subsequent implementation.

Do you have any feedback? Email us at feedback@currajong.org.au

Your comments are confidential and will go directly to the CEO for consideration.

We encourage all stakeholders to send through their views so we can all strive to make Currajong Disability Services a better and more progressive organisation.

Kimberley Hughes enjoys the range of creative options CDS offers.
Kimberley Hughes enjoys the range of creative options CDS offers.

CLIENT PROFILE

Kimberley Hughes, 32, Peak Hill

What do you love most about CDS? Line dancing, volunteering at Southern Cross and interacting with people.

What is your favourite thing to do here? Writing short horror stories.

How long have you been at CDS? About 3 years.

What would you change about CDS? It would be great if we could make our own horror movie here at CDS.
Email your photos and stories to – dane.millerd@currajong.org.au for our next weekly newsletter email.

Deadline is 10am each Thursday.

The weekly email newsletter is designed to keep everyone abreast of events and changes within the organisation in relation to the NDIS and subsequent implementation.

Do you have any feedback? Email us at feedback@currajong.org.au

Your comments are confidential and will go directly to the CEO for consideration. We encourage all stakeholders to send through their views so we can all strive to make Currajong Disability Services a better and more progressive organisation.