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Currajong NDIS Service Pricing Guide July 1, 2020

See link – https://currajong.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Currajong-NDIS-Service-Pricing-_-July-1-2020-1.pdf

** The NDIA sets price limits for some supports to ensure they provide value for money for participants.

Changes to prices are updated to respond to market trends and changes in costs and are generally identified through an Annual Price Review, with any new prices outlined in an updated price guide, effective 1 July each year.

You can find the latest support catalogue and price information on the NDIS website at this link – https://www.ndis.gov.au/providers/price-guides-and-pricing

Latest NDIS advice for participants/providers – 25 March

The NDIA is making some changes to the plan review process in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

If a participant has a scheduled plan review, the NDIA will contact them by phone or email to undertake their review.

As part of this plan review process, a participant can discuss having a new plan in place for up to 24 months.

In addition, the NDIA will be making changes to NDIS systems over the weekend to make sure participants have the funding they need during the
coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

To ensure participant plans don’t end, on the day a plan is due to expire, it will be automatically be extended by 365 days.

Previously these automatic plan extensions were for 28 days but will now will be 365.

Participants who have plans that expires soon, do not need to do anything to have their plans automatically extended by 365 days.

For more info go to – https://www.ndis.gov.au/

New head of the NDIS Martin Hoffman

THE federal government’s decisions to raise the National Disability Insurance Agency’s public service staffing levels and appoint Martin Hoffman as chief executive have been met with cautious optimism from groups representing people with disability and service providers.

While the announcement that the NDIA would employ 800 additional public servants drew praise from the Community and Public Sector Union, shadow minister for the NDIS Bill Shorten kept up the pressure on his opposite number, Stuart Robert, while welcoming the announcement.

“People with disability will want to know whether the new CEO has any lived experience of disability,” Shorten said. “It also remains unclear whether he will base himself at the NDIA headquarters in Geelong.”

The head of People with Disability Australia, Jeff Smith, was pleased by the staffing boost and welcomed Hoffman’s appointment but also called on the NDIA to keep looking for opportunities to employ people with disabilities.

“We know that many aspects of the NDIS need fixing so that all people with disability who need support are getting that support in a timely and appropriate way,” Smith said, in comments reported by Disability Support Guide.

“There have been too many delays and too many hurdles to accessing these essential supports so far, particularly for people with disability who face additional barriers to the NDIS. People with disability need the NDIS to deliver on its promise to us about inclusion, equality and support.”

The CPSU said its acting national secretary, Melissa Donnelly, and deputy secretary Beth Vincent-Pietsch met the minister last month to discuss the NDIA’s staffing levels and argue the government’s cap on public service employees was having a direct impact on NDIS participants, and more staff were needed in particular to address a backlog in applications for NDIS support.

“We welcome the decision to lift the cap and provide an extra 800 staff in the NDIA,” said Vincent-Pietsch. “It is a great starting point and a great win for our members who have been campaigning for secure work and more staff.

“This is excellent news for NDIA workers, for the agency, and for the participants that rely on the NDIS for support. We’re glad the government is finally recognising its responsibility to better staff the NDIA, and we now expect the government to recognise its impact on the rest of our vital public services and to lift the staffing cap across the board.”

Shorten was less charitable in his response. “By their actions the Liberals have finally admitted the rigid staffing cap they imposed on the NDIA in 2014 has been hurting people with disability and depriving them of much needed goods and services,” said the shadow minister.

“Labor welcomes the lifting of the cap by 800 employees to 4,000 for this vital national scheme but this is a drop in the ocean when it comes to the expertise that needs to be brought back in-house. The NDIA originally estimated its staffing levels would be 10,595 staff by 2018-2019 but instead a low cap still exists while the bill to the taxpayer for consultants and contractors has ballooned from $70 million in 2016 to $430 million in 2018.”

Shorten repeated his criticism of the minister over the six months it took to find a new CEO for the NDIA. He also suggested Hoffman’s move to the NDIA would affect the Services Australia reforms, as the new CEO was previously playing a key role in guiding the process, which is supposed to transform the Department of Human Services into a more customer-focused organisation.

Several groups representing people with particular kinds of disabilities also welcomed the announcements as did David Moody, the acting CEO of National Disability Services, a peak body for service providers.

“The challenges ahead for the agency and the scheme are well-known and have been publicly articulated by NDS for a number of years now,” Moody said.

“Of primary concern to providers are the issues around pricing and payment delays, and workforce planning and growth necessary so that NDIS participants can be assured of access to quality supports without unnecessary bureaucracy and red tape.”

In Brisbane, the Courier-Mail questioned the minister on the salaries paid to NDIA executives, which total $23 million a year between 94 people, according to the newspaper. “This is an extraordinary national enterprise and it needs [an] extraordinary group of executives to run it,” Robert responded, while Shorten agreed that the head of the agency was paid too much.

  • Info courtesy of Disability Support Guide, NDIA and media sources
Chris Spicer

AUSTRALIANS with a disability are being asked to share their experiences with a new review aimed at cutting wait times under the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Former finance department secretary David Tune will review the scheme’s legislation and rules, with a view to streamlining processes.

NDIS Minister Stuart Robert said the inquiry will help the federal government deliver on its promise to address issues with timeframes around setting up or altering plans for NDIS participants.

The coalition has vowed to introduce the new standards by mid-2020.

‘We are listening, and will be consulting with people with disability and their families, the disability services sector, ministers and officials from Commonwealth and state governments and the National Disability Insurance Agency as part of this review,” Mr Roberts said on Monday.

Consultations will begin later this month with an online survey, discussion paper and face-to-face workshops across the country.

Mr Tune retired from the public service in 2014 and has since led reviews into MPs’ parliamentary entitlements and the aged care system.

“Mr Tune has a great deal of experience in reviewing important policy and is a great choice to lead this next phase of making the NDIS even better,’ Mr Robert said.

The NDIS will support up to 500,000 people over the next five years.

Mr Robert has already said he wants wait times for children accessing support to be cut in half by October, using a new waiting “cap” of 50 days.

The average wait time for children to receive NDIS plans at the moment is 127 days.

Australian Associated Press

NDIS waiting times are set to be halved by mid 2020 according to Disabilities Minister Stuart Robson

AUSTRALIANS with a disability are being asked to share their experiences with a new review aimed at cutting wait times under the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Former finance department secretary David Tune will review the scheme’s legislation and rules, with a view to streamlining processes.

NDIS Minister Stuart Robert said the inquiry will help the federal government deliver on its promise to address issues with timeframes around setting up or altering plans for NDIS participants.

The coalition has vowed to introduce the new standards by mid-2020.

‘We are listening, and will be consulting with people with disability and their families, the disability services sector, ministers and officials from Commonwealth and state governments and the National Disability Insurance Agency as part of this review,” Mr Roberts said on Monday.

Consultations will begin later this month with an online survey, discussion paper and face-to-face workshops across the country.

Mr Tune retired from the public service in 2014 and has since led reviews into MPs’ parliamentary entitlements and the aged care system.

“Mr Tune has a great deal of experience in reviewing important policy and is a great choice to lead this next phase of making the NDIS even better,’ Mr Robert said.

The NDIS will support up to 500,000 people over the next five years.

Mr Robert has already said he wants wait times for children accessing support to be cut in half by October, using a new waiting “cap” of 50 days.

The average wait time for children to receive NDIS plans at the moment is 127 days.

Australian Associated Press

Trilbie Bermingham, Amanda Clifton and Shane Spicer at Parkes CDS HQ

A NEW report has highlighted the discrimination and hardship people with disability face, with over 60 percent of survey respondents unable to afford to get access to the disability support they require.

Disability Rights Now 2019: Shadow Report to the United Nations Committee on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has been a collaborative effort by Disabled People’s Organisations, disability representatives and advocacy organisations from around Australia.

The report, which has been endorsed by over 80 organisations from around the country, includes the findings from a survey of almost 900 Australians with disability and reviews the country’s progress in implementing the CRPD, which focuses on upholding the rights of people with disability.

Executive Director of Women With Disabilities Australia, Carolyn Frohmader, says the report was an opportunity for people with disability across Australia to tell the United Nations about the widespread hardship, discrimination, violence and poverty they face every day.

“As part of the national consultation, nearly 900 people with disability from every State and Territory filled out a survey.

“The results showed how far we still have to go in making sure we have the same rights as everyone else.

“Australia is breaching our human rights commitments to people with disability, including in the areas of violence, restrictive practices and forced sterilisation, education and the over-representation of people with disability in the criminal justice system,” Ms Frohmader says.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of First People’s Disability Network, Damian Griffis, says the report also shows Indigenous people with disability routinely have their rights ignored, particularly in the criminal justice system.

“Indigenous people with disability are 14 times more likely to be imprisoned than the rest of the population,” Mr Griffis explains.

“50 percent of the total prison population report a history of psychosocial disability, almost one-third report disability, and 25 percent to 30 percent of prisoners have an intellectual disability.”

Mr Griffis says survey respondents reported major concerns over the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

“People with disability emphasised how hard it is to access the NDIS, how difficult the NDIS is to us and about long waits for advocacy to help with the process.

“In addition, a majority of people with disability (61 percent) reported not being able to afford or get access to the disability support they need.

“Many people with disability die decades younger than their non-disabled peers.”

Ms Frohmader added that the report shows how far Australia has to go before people with disability have the same freedoms and rights as non-disabled people.

“We know Australia has made significant progress over the last five years with the implementation of the NDIS and the establishment of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of People with Disability, but many of the issues that we reported on before are still the same in 2019, and that has to change.”

The UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will review Australia’s progress in September in Geneva and a delegation of people with disability will be in attendance to present this report to the CRPD Committee and discuss the findings.

The groups who contributed to the report include:

  • Disabled People’s Organisations Australia (DPO Australia)
  • Council for Intellectual Disability NSW (CID)
  • Queensland Advocacy Incorporated (QAI)
  • Advocacy for Inclusion (AFI)
  • Disability Advocacy Network Australia (DANA)
  • Australian Centre for Disability Law (ACDL)
  • Queensland Voice for Mental Health (QVMH)
  • Children and Young People with Disability Australia (CYDA)
  • Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO)

The Disability Rights Now 2019 report was made possible by the Australian Government Attorney-General’s Department and PwC Australia.

You can read the report here.

Charles Hamer (seated) with Donna Little of CDS.
Charles Hamer (seated) with Donna Little of CDS.
CHARLES LIVING PRINCELY LIFE AFTER GETTING NEW JOB
 
CHARLES Hamer is a great example of dedication and resilience. From having no job, living in shared accommodation and no license, the CDS client is now ticking all the boxes and it is not only because of his drive but the tremendous support from his carers.
 
“I have some great people in my life who have helped me get to where I am today,” said Charles.
 
“From Donna and Jodie through to direct carers such as Ian, Rodney and Martin – they have all played a part.
 
“I am now in my first month at McDonalds, living independently and have a full license,” he said.
 
“It has been a real boost to my confidence and I can say I have never been happier!”
 
Charles also credits his new found happiness to the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in the Central West stating that the new model is one of the big reasons he is in the position he is in today.
 
“The NDIS allows me to choose what I want to do, when, how and who with,” he said.
 
“Currajong has been extremely helpful and supportive.
 
“I have really turned a corner and am now planning ahead with confidence,” he said.
 
“I am actually contemplating doing some TAFE courses and study to further my hospitality skills and add to my existing skill set.”
 
Despite all the positive news Charles remains focused and grounded.
 
“I just take one day at a time and keep doing the best that I can,” he said.
 
“That mindset has brought me this far.
 
“And I hope it continues to serve me well.”
 
(CAPTION: Charles Hamer seated with Donna Little of CDS)
Do you qualify for the NDIS?
Do you qualify for the NDIS?

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is the new way of providing individualised support for people with disability, their families and carers – it’s the insurance that is designed to give us all peace of mind.

“Disability could affect anyone and having the right support makes a big difference,” a spokesperson said. “The NDIS provides eligible people a flexible, whole-of-life approach to the support needed to pursue their goals and aspirations and participate in daily life.

“The NDIS is a big change and will be progressively rolled out across NSW and should be operating statewide by July 2018.”

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is working closely with the relevant Commonwealth and NSW government departments to ensure there is a smooth transition to the NDIS for people with disability, their families, carers and providers.

If you currently access services you will be contacted to discuss the process of entering the NDIS but if your region has already transitioned, don’t hesitate to be in touch.

Some people aren’t sure if they qualify so here are the rules. To access the NDIS you must:

  1. Live in Australia and be: an Australian citizen OR a permanent resident OR hold a Protected Special Category Visa.
  2. To receive the NDIS you must be aged under 65 years. In some locations, you need to be a certain age to access the NDIS during the trial period. Other supports may be available if you don’t qualify.
  3. To access the NDIS right now, you must live in an NDIS area on a designated date. In some of these areas, you also need to be a certain age to use the scheme.
  4. To meet the NDIS disability rules you need to have an impairment or condition that is likely to be permanent (lifelong) and that stops you from doing everyday things by yourself.

The following questions may help you decide if your answer is ‘yes’.

Do you usually need support from a person or assistive equipment so you can:

  • Understand and be understood by other people?
  • Make and keep friends and cope with feelings and emotions?
  • Understand, remember and learn new things?
  • Get out of bed and move around the home and outside the home?
  • Take a bath or shower, dress and eat?
  • Do daily jobs, handle money and make decisions?

Early intervention rules

To meet the NDIS early intervention rules, you need to have an impairment or condition that is likely to be permanent (lifelong), or be a child under six years of age with a developmental delay and the delay means you usually need more help with your self-care, communication, learning or motor skills than another child of the same age.

Early intervention supports provided by the NDIS are those not provided by any other services such as health and education.

The following questions may help you decide if your answer is ‘yes’. Would early intervention:

  • Reduce the impact of your impairment or condition or developmental delay?
  • Stop the impact of your impairment or condition from getting worse?
  • Strengthen your informal supports, such as helping a carer to keep supporting you?

Call the NDIA on 1800 800 110 if you have any questions or to ask for an access request form.

The NDIS roll-out at CDS has been successful so far.
The NDIS roll-out at CDS has been successful so far.

NDIS stands for the National Disability Insurance Scheme and is operated by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA).

At its core, the NDIS is a healthcare program created by the Australian Federal Government for the benefit of people who have a permanent disability, either from an injury or something the person was born with.

Its main purpose is to provide funding for the specific levels of support that an affected individual needs to be a part of society.

That means not just participating in social activities and being able to do more things for themselves with the right assistive technology, but also to the point of helping as many as possible to enter (or re-enter) the workforce.

Having been rolled out across the nation after a number of trial areas helped phase in the scheme, the NDIA anticipates that “the NDIS will provide about 460,000 Australians under the age of 65 with a permanent and significant disability with the reasonable and necessary supports they need to live an ordinary life.”

Not every disabled person is eligible, however. To become an NDIS participant a person must fulfill all of the following criteria:

  • Have a permanent disability that significantly affects their ability to take part in everyday activities
  • Be aged less than 65 when they first enter the NDIS
  • Be an Australian citizen or hold a permanent visa or a Protected Special Category visa, and
  • Live in Australia where the NDIS is available

David Bowen, the inaugural CEO of the NDIA, started on the project well before the rollout. He was a member of the Independent Panel advising the Productivity Commission in its inquiry into the feasibility of an NDIS.

In mid-March this year David announced that he was retiring. Rob De Luca is now the new CEO, playing a key role in the full rollout of the NDIS.

Mr De Luca was until recently the managing director of Bankwest.

“Mr De Luca deeply understands the importance of improving social and economic outcomes for participants in a way that delivers a quality participant experience,” social services minister Christian Porter said.

Mr Porter also paid tribute to retiring NDIS CEO David Bowen. “David’s dedication, professionalism and leadership of the NDIA have been critically important.”

The NDIS has had a semi-successful rollout, with some people benefiting exactly as intended. Meanwhile others have missed out, either entirely or partially.

There are many NDIS office locations in NSW – see https://www.ndis.gov.au/about-us/locations#nsw for your nearest office.

Phone 1800 800 110 or see the website www.ndis.gov.au/about-us/contact-us ​for more information about the NDIS.

  • Info courtesy of the NDIA
CDS CEO Jeff Evans is excited about the new WesterNDIS initiative
CDS CEO Jeff Evans is excited about the new WesterNDIS initiative

WesterNDIS has launched today, bringing together the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) expertise of four trusted local not-for-profit businesses to support people across western NSW to get the most out of the NDIS.

The WesterNDIS portal is a collaboration between Birrang Enterprise Development Company, Currajong Disability Services, Marathon Health, and The Westhaven Association.

It will connect people with a disability, their carers and support people to a range of NDIS services across Western NSW.

People visiting the online portal will be able to access information about accommodation options, allied health therapies, support to access employment and social activities, options to learn new skills, and how support coordination can help them.

People can register to receive preplanning support and help to get their application together. They can also register where they are up to on their NDIS journey, their interests and the kinds of services they would like to hear about into the future.

Jeff Evans, CEO at Currajong Disability Services said that the collaboration stemmed from a desire to give people in Western NSW the choice and control over getting the best out of the scheme’s promises.

“Much has been made about the competition the NDIS will create between providers. In our view we are looking forward to building partnerships with other providers so we create the right conditions for the development of easy access to our services; to support people living with a disability in our more rural and remote communities.”

“We believe in the value of a collaborative approach, allowing people to see what services are available from a range of quality providers across the region, and for people with a disability to tell us what the services they are looking for, now and into the future.”

“We hope that our approach will support more people right across Western NSW to get the best out of the NDIS,” said Mr Evans.

Roadshows are planned across western NSW to introduce people the NDIS internet site (portal) and to explain how they can use it to find out what’s out there for them.

People with a disability, their carers or support workers can visit www.westerndis.com.au to register, email ask@westerndis.com.au for more information or find us on Facebook.

The National Disability Insurance Scheme commenced rollout in Western NSW on 1 July 2017.