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Matt Medlyn and Jannette Lovett

DISABILITY STATS
What is Disability?
A disability is any condition that restricts a person’s mental, sensory or mobility functions. It may be
caused by accident, trauma, genetics or disease. A disability may be temporary or permanent, total or
partial, lifelong or acquired, visible or invisible. See our page What is Disability for more information
– https://www.and.org.au/pages/what-is-a-disability.html
Demographics
 Over 4 million people in Australia have some form of disability. That’s 1 in 5 people.
18.6% of females and 18.0% of males in Australia have disability.
 The likelihood of living with disability increases with age. 2 in 5 people with disability are 65 years
or older.
 1.8 million or 50.7 % of Australians aged 65 and over have disability, compared to 1 in 8 (12.5 %)
aged under 65.
 2.1 million Australians of working age (15 – 64 years) have disability.
 35.9% of Australia’s 8.9 million households include a person with disability.

Types of Disability
 Only 4.4% of people with a disability in Australia use a wheelchair.
1 in 6 Australians are affected by hearing loss. There are approximately 30,000 Deaf Auslan
users with total hearing loss [1].
 Vision Australia estimates there are currently 357,000 people in Australia who are blind or have
low vision. They project that the number of Australians who are blind or have low vision will grow
to 564,000 by 2030. (Refractive error not included). [2]
 45% of Australians aged 16–85 years, experience a mental health condition during their lifetime.
[3]
 3 million Australians live with depression or anxiety. [3]
 Research shows job or financial loss can increase a person’s risk of health problems, such as
depression and anxiety. [4]

Employment of People with Disability
 People aged between 15 and 64 years with disability have both lower participation (53%) and
higher unemployment rates (9.4%) than people without disability (83% and 4.9% respectively).
 There are 2.1 million Australians of working age with disability. Of these, just over 1 million are
employed and another 114,900 are looking for work.
 Australia’s employment rate for people with disability (46.6% in 2015) is on par with developed
countries. In developing countries, 80% to 90% of people with disability of working age are
unemployed, whereas in industrialised countries the figure is between 50% and 70%. [5]
 34% of people with disability are managers & professionals.
Graduates with disability take 56.2 % longer to gain fulltime employment than other graduates.
[6]
People with disability aged 15-24 years are 10 times more likely to experience discrimination
than those aged 65 years and over.
 The source of discrimination is an employer in almost half of those instances.
 Global research has found that when employee health and wellness is managed well the
percentage of engaged employees increases from 7% to 55%. [7]

 73 percent of employees who say they work at a “purpose-driven” company are engaged,
compared to just 23 percent of those who don’t. [8]
The quick self-assessment is a 10 question assessment for a glimpse into your organisations access
and inclusion for people with disability, and to gain an understanding of what the Access and Inclusion
Index is about. No information that identifies an organisation is collected as part of the Quick Self-
Assessment. Take a Quick Self-Assessment – https://accessandinclusionindex.com.au/…/quick-self-assess…/
Customers with disability
 People with disability are three times as likely to avoid an organisation and twice as likely to
dissuade others because of an organisation’s negative diversity reputation. [9]
 36% of people with disability are often treated less favourably than customers without disability.
[9]
 28% of people with disability have experienced discrimination by one or more of the
organisations they’ve recently interacted with. [9]
 1 in 3 people with disability report that their customer needs are often unmet [9].
 62% of SME’s have not done anything in the past 12 months to make it easier for customers with
disability. For almost half of these, there is a perception of not being asked to. “We have received
no specific requests.” [10]

Other disability statistics
* The likelihood of living with disability increases with age; 31% of 55-64 year olds are living with disability.
* Almost nine in ten people aged 90 and over (88%) have a disability.
* Disability discrimination accounts for the highest volume of complaints across the board to the Australian
Human Rights Commission.
* Over one third (35.1%) of women and over one quarter (28.1%) of men aged 15 years and over had
avoided situations because of their disability.
* Projections for 2050 indicate that one in every four Australians will have hearing loss. 90% of people
born with hearing impairment are born into hearing families. [1]
* Some 639,300 people with disability used mobility aids (14.9% of those with disability).
* Almost 500,000 people had made home modifications such as grab rails (337,800 or 8.2% of those with
disability), modifying their bathroom, toilet or laundry (222,600 or 5.4% of those with disability) or
installing ramps (100,200 or 2.4% of those with disability).

Sources
Except where stated otherwise, data is taken from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2016, 4430.0 – Survey of Disability, Ageing and
Carers 2015, viewed 24 February 2017.
[1] ‘Listen Hear! The economic impact and cost of hearing loss in Australia’ 2006, Access Economics, viewed 24 February 2017.
[2] Vision Australia estimate is based on ABS population data and ABS Survey of Disability Ageing and Carers.
[3] Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2008, 4326.0 – National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007,
viewed 24 February 2017.
[4] Price, R.H., Choi, J.N. and Vinokur, A.D. 2002, Links in the chain of adversity following job loss: How financial strain and loss of
personal control lead to depression, impaired functioning, and poor health, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7(4), 302-312.
[5] ‘Employment of persons with disabilities’ 2007, United Nations Department of Public Information, viewed 24 February 2017.
[6] ‘Grad Stats’, 2015, Graduate Careers Australia, viewed 24 February 2017.
[7] ‘Benefits to business: The evidence for investing in health and wellbeing’ 2011, ComCare, viewed 15 March 2017.
[8] Inc Magazine 2014, How a Sense of Purpose Boosts Engagement, viewed 15 March 2017.
[9] ‘Missing out: The business case for customer diversity’ 2017, Australian Human Rights Commission, viewed 15 March 2017.
[10] ‘2017 Disability Confidence Survey’ 2017, Australian Network on Disability, viewed 19 February 2018.

Chris Spicer

AUSTRALIANS with a disability are being asked to share their experiences with a new review aimed at cutting wait times under the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Former finance department secretary David Tune will review the scheme’s legislation and rules, with a view to streamlining processes.

NDIS Minister Stuart Robert said the inquiry will help the federal government deliver on its promise to address issues with timeframes around setting up or altering plans for NDIS participants.

The coalition has vowed to introduce the new standards by mid-2020.

‘We are listening, and will be consulting with people with disability and their families, the disability services sector, ministers and officials from Commonwealth and state governments and the National Disability Insurance Agency as part of this review,” Mr Roberts said on Monday.

Consultations will begin later this month with an online survey, discussion paper and face-to-face workshops across the country.

Mr Tune retired from the public service in 2014 and has since led reviews into MPs’ parliamentary entitlements and the aged care system.

“Mr Tune has a great deal of experience in reviewing important policy and is a great choice to lead this next phase of making the NDIS even better,’ Mr Robert said.

The NDIS will support up to 500,000 people over the next five years.

Mr Robert has already said he wants wait times for children accessing support to be cut in half by October, using a new waiting “cap” of 50 days.

The average wait time for children to receive NDIS plans at the moment is 127 days.

Australian Associated Press

Sarah Bowkett and Sharnie Morris

EACH year on August 19 the world stops to acknowledge World Humanitarian Day. The day is used to increase public awareness about humanitarian assistance activities worldwide and the importance of international cooperation in this regard, as well as to honour all humanitarian and United Nations associated personnel who have worked in the promotion of the humanitarian cause and those who have lost their lives in the cause of duty.

This World Humanitarian Day 2019 we honour the work of women in crises throughout the world. We focus on the unsung heroes who have long been working on the front lines in their own communities in some of the most difficult terrains, from the war-wounded in Afghanistan, to the food insecure in the Sahel, to those who have lost their homes and livelihoods in places such as Central African Republic, South Sudan, Syria and Yemen. And we salute the efforts of women aid workers from across the world, who rally to people in need.

Women make up a large number of those who risk their own lives to save others. They are often the first to respond and the last to leave. These women deserve to be celebrated. They are needed today as much as ever to strengthen the global humanitarian response. And world leaders as well as non-state actors must ensure that they – and all humanitarians – are guaranteed the protection afforded to them under international law.

#WomenHumanitarians

NDIS waiting times are set to be halved by mid 2020 according to Disabilities Minister Stuart Robson

AUSTRALIANS with a disability are being asked to share their experiences with a new review aimed at cutting wait times under the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Former finance department secretary David Tune will review the scheme’s legislation and rules, with a view to streamlining processes.

NDIS Minister Stuart Robert said the inquiry will help the federal government deliver on its promise to address issues with timeframes around setting up or altering plans for NDIS participants.

The coalition has vowed to introduce the new standards by mid-2020.

‘We are listening, and will be consulting with people with disability and their families, the disability services sector, ministers and officials from Commonwealth and state governments and the National Disability Insurance Agency as part of this review,” Mr Roberts said on Monday.

Consultations will begin later this month with an online survey, discussion paper and face-to-face workshops across the country.

Mr Tune retired from the public service in 2014 and has since led reviews into MPs’ parliamentary entitlements and the aged care system.

“Mr Tune has a great deal of experience in reviewing important policy and is a great choice to lead this next phase of making the NDIS even better,’ Mr Robert said.

The NDIS will support up to 500,000 people over the next five years.

Mr Robert has already said he wants wait times for children accessing support to be cut in half by October, using a new waiting “cap” of 50 days.

The average wait time for children to receive NDIS plans at the moment is 127 days.

Australian Associated Press

Trilbie Bermingham, Amanda Clifton and Shane Spicer at Parkes CDS HQ

A NEW report has highlighted the discrimination and hardship people with disability face, with over 60 percent of survey respondents unable to afford to get access to the disability support they require.

Disability Rights Now 2019: Shadow Report to the United Nations Committee on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has been a collaborative effort by Disabled People’s Organisations, disability representatives and advocacy organisations from around Australia.

The report, which has been endorsed by over 80 organisations from around the country, includes the findings from a survey of almost 900 Australians with disability and reviews the country’s progress in implementing the CRPD, which focuses on upholding the rights of people with disability.

Executive Director of Women With Disabilities Australia, Carolyn Frohmader, says the report was an opportunity for people with disability across Australia to tell the United Nations about the widespread hardship, discrimination, violence and poverty they face every day.

“As part of the national consultation, nearly 900 people with disability from every State and Territory filled out a survey.

“The results showed how far we still have to go in making sure we have the same rights as everyone else.

“Australia is breaching our human rights commitments to people with disability, including in the areas of violence, restrictive practices and forced sterilisation, education and the over-representation of people with disability in the criminal justice system,” Ms Frohmader says.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of First People’s Disability Network, Damian Griffis, says the report also shows Indigenous people with disability routinely have their rights ignored, particularly in the criminal justice system.

“Indigenous people with disability are 14 times more likely to be imprisoned than the rest of the population,” Mr Griffis explains.

“50 percent of the total prison population report a history of psychosocial disability, almost one-third report disability, and 25 percent to 30 percent of prisoners have an intellectual disability.”

Mr Griffis says survey respondents reported major concerns over the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

“People with disability emphasised how hard it is to access the NDIS, how difficult the NDIS is to us and about long waits for advocacy to help with the process.

“In addition, a majority of people with disability (61 percent) reported not being able to afford or get access to the disability support they need.

“Many people with disability die decades younger than their non-disabled peers.”

Ms Frohmader added that the report shows how far Australia has to go before people with disability have the same freedoms and rights as non-disabled people.

“We know Australia has made significant progress over the last five years with the implementation of the NDIS and the establishment of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of People with Disability, but many of the issues that we reported on before are still the same in 2019, and that has to change.”

The UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will review Australia’s progress in September in Geneva and a delegation of people with disability will be in attendance to present this report to the CRPD Committee and discuss the findings.

The groups who contributed to the report include:

  • Disabled People’s Organisations Australia (DPO Australia)
  • Council for Intellectual Disability NSW (CID)
  • Queensland Advocacy Incorporated (QAI)
  • Advocacy for Inclusion (AFI)
  • Disability Advocacy Network Australia (DANA)
  • Australian Centre for Disability Law (ACDL)
  • Queensland Voice for Mental Health (QVMH)
  • Children and Young People with Disability Australia (CYDA)
  • Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO)

The Disability Rights Now 2019 report was made possible by the Australian Government Attorney-General’s Department and PwC Australia.

You can read the report here.

Benny Bogan, MC of Australia's Biggest Bogan Festival with Martin Carney who ate 25 sausage sandwiches on Saturday to help CDS.

WINNERS/ HIGHLIGHTS

Bunsters Hot Sauce and Blue Sky Australia’s Biggest Bogan – Ryan Leigh “Bogan” Edwards

Buttabeef and Central Butchery Sausage Sandwich Eating Champion – Martin Carney (he ate 25 sausage sandwiches for Currajong)

Adam Molloy Carpentry Best Dad Bod – Tim Acheson

Bogan Gate Beef Jerky and Food Fix Worst Tatt – Jo Maloney

Johnson’s Bakery “Show Us Your Buns!” Shortest Stubbie Shorts – Benjamin Parslow

Byrnes Clothing Biggest Dazza – David Gloomper aka Poita

Byrnes Clothing Biggest Shazza – Carolyn Harrison

JJ Electrical Best Mullet – Ryan Leigh “Bogan” Edwards

Steele Tech Worst Smile – Sharon “Shazza” Piggott

Publicans Challenge Euchre – Forster and Coral Downey

Publicans Challenge Darts – Brent Poidevin

Publicans Challenge Kelly Pool – Mitch Braybon

Coffe Fix by Larz Wife Calling – Brent Poidevin

Acheson’s Husband Calling – Sharon “Shazza” Piggott

Darren Cowan Mobile Welding Air Guitar Champs – Naomi Clarke

Bunsters Bogans n Beers Hot Chip Challenge – David Fishy Taylor

Vantage NSW Khe Sahn Karaoke – Bec Price

Parkes Landscape Aussie Bronze Drop – Murray ‘Big Red’ Dunn

Air Sex, Whore on the Floor and Bush Poet weren’t held.

· Other highlights – Debbie Martin bought the Bogan Mobile at the auction for $520 for Currajong.
· Lara Tulaga and Nigel Constable auctioned a Bogan Gate Beef Jerky hoodie for $200 for Currajong.
· Each venue to donate minimum $250 to Currajong – eg. Cambridge Hotel, Post Officer Hotel, Railway Hotel Bogan Gate and Forbes Services Club.
· 0 DUI’s, 0 RDT’s, 0 fights or vehicle incidents and only 2 people were asked to leave. The police said it was a well-run and fantastic event especially given the stigma with the word bogan and they recognised it was for a good cause.

Numbers for the whole weekend were around 500 +

Thanks to all staff, volunteers and sponsors and we can’t wait to see you next year!

Timbo Wheeler and Neil Hamilton of Currajong Disability Services manning the BBQ for the Sausage Sandwich Contest at Australia's Biggest Bogan Fest.

THERE was sausage sandwich eating, husband calling, air guitar and inevitably the crowning of Australia’s Biggest Bogan – all in the name of charity and for Currajong Disability Services.

Around 500 people braved the cold conditions across numerous venues throughout three shires last Friday and Saturday and the entertainment was top notch featuring local bands Rawson Road, the Noll Brothers and Amanda G as well as well-known performers Hype Duo, Chris Franklin and Benny Bogan among many others.

For Currajong Disability Services Communications and Marketing Manager Dane Millerd the event was a huge success for a first attempt.

“There were no major incidents and the police have complimented all concerned on how well the event was run,” said Dane.

“So many people have makde this possible despite having no connection to Currajong.

“The generosity of spirit of people who came here from all over Australia is humbling,” he said.

Visitors came from as far away as Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania and Western Australia for the first edition of Australia’s Biggest Bogan Festival and all have said they’ll be back to support it again next year.

“I have to make a special mention to a number of people including Brad Gibson and Luke Acheson for organising this as well as Tara Shaw, Cina Horan and Benjamin Parslow for their tireless efforts all in the name of charity,” said Dane.

“Big thanks to Lara and Nigel from Food Fix and Bogan Gate Beef Jerky for their auction of their one-of-a-kind hoodie and beef jerky donation of $200 to Currajong as well as Deb Martin who bought the bogan mobile for $520 for Currajong too.

“Lastly, I’d like to thank all volunteers, staff, sponsors and punters however a special mention must be made to Benny Bogan who donated his entire appearance fee back to Currajong – what a legend!”

With the count from the weekend still underway, Currajong will also stand to benefit from the donations of a number of venues as well as the returns from the cash for cans through the return and earn scheme.

“It’s all very positive stuff and we can’t wait til next year,” said MC and organiser Luke Acheson.

“People are already planning their trip next year.

“It is truly incredible how people from far and wide have rallied together to help out a local charity.”

Until next year bogans!

http://www.boganfest.com.au

GEORGIE’S PANTRY DONATES FRESH FOOD TO CDS
 
IN another example of community spirit and generosity, Georgie’s Pantry has kindly donated fresh fruit and vegetables to the homes of Currajong Disability Services residents.
 
For Currajong Disability Services Residential Team Leader Donna Little (pictured, right), the donation is a prime example of the great relationship Georgie’s Pantry has with Currajong and the broader Parkes community.
 
“For some time, Georgie’s Pantry have been there to help those in need with all sorts of things from fresh fruit and vegetables and much more,” Donna said.
 
“They exemplify all that is great about Parkes and the Parkes business community.
 
“They have been a tremendous supporter of us and we can’t thank them enough,” she said.
 
Georgie’s Pantry donated four boxes of fresh fruit and vegetable to the four residences in Parkes that Currajong owns and operates.
 
“I’d like to thank Natalie Quince (pictured) and Derek Milling as well as our chairman Neil Unger for making this happen,” said Donna.
 
“I know all of our residents greatly appreciated the donation.
 
“From all of us at Currajong – thank you.”
 
Mandy Reedy (right and back on) putting clients through their paces.

MANDY’S FITABILITY 9 WEEK CHALLENGE

WEEKS 1 and 2

After a good walk to warm up, clients got familiar with lower body weight training (squats and lunges) and light weighted upper body training.

Week Three we stepped it up a notch and held our hand weights and dumbbells while we did our chair squats!

Some participants even upped their weights for upper body training, holding 2 plates in each hand. Talk about progress!!!

As always we finished our session with a few KONGA Dance Fitness tracks. It is always a popular part of the program.

I demonstrated the moves with options to lower or increase intensity and difficulty and everyone has a good go.

The main focus? “Keep moving and have fun!” And everyone is certainly doing that!

“I want to do the exercises” said Jaime Nielsen, when she thought she may miss out this week.

It’s so exciting to see everyone having a go, sweaty, red faces and more enthusiasm and confidence to dance each week.

Keep up the good work guys!

Amanda Reedy

Ian Kaupke, Jamie Cooke, Dane Millerd, Troy Peters and Peter Rawson

WHEN Troy Peters of the Commonwealth Bank in Parkes was asked why they chose Currajong Disability Services to donate $500 to his answer was simple:

“We constantly see what you (Currajong) do in the community and the effort and culture is incredible …”

“Customers tell us at the bank all the time about how tremendous the team is at Currajong,” he said.

“It was an easy task for us to choose Currajong.

“You chose yourselves,” Mr. Peters said.

For Dane Millerd of Currajong Disability Services, the donation not only strengthens the relationship with the Commonwealth Bank but further highlights the tremendous community spirit in Parkes.

“We’ve said it before but the sense of community in Parkes is incredible,” Dane said.

“People realise what we are about at Currajong and the importance of the services we provide.

“Without these kind contributions we couldn’t survive,” he said.

The latest donation comes on the back of another kind contribution of $5000 from Parkes Services Club to help reduce transport costs for Currajong.

“We are ecstatic with the amazing levels of support and can’t thank everyone enough!”

It has been a big few months for Currajong with donations coming from numerous quarters and the announcement of the purchase of a new premises on the Orange Road.

“It is a great time to be at Currajong and Jeff and the team have worked very hard over the past two years to get us where we are,” said Dane.